The Top 5 Kitchen and Bath Trends at KBIS 2015

  KBIS 2015 Trends | Cozy Stylish Chic

I just returned from Las Vegas, where I spent nearly a week with BlogTourVegas at the annual Kitchen and Bath Industry Show (KBIS), where premier kitchen and bath brands come together to show off their newest introductions and innovations to designers, dealers, and editors from around the globe.  Last  year I navigated the show solo, but this year I attended with Modenus’ BlogTourVegas which consisted of 18 designers and design bloggers from around the world.  Needless to say, this year’s trip was much more eventful than last year’s, with tours of several suites in the Mandarin Oriental Residences, a tour of the New American Home, parties, media tours and lots of one on one time with the brands that sponsored our trip (in no particular order): TotoUSA, Walker Zanger, Wilsonart, Top Knobs, KBIS, Poggenpohl, Blanco, Cosentino, Wood-Mode, Thermador, Mr. Steam and Mohawk.

One of the main reasons I enjoy attending KBIS is to see all the kitchen and bath manufacturers all in one place, albeit a very large and expansive show floor that encompass 3 large halls in the Las Vegas Convention Center.  Having all the brands and product in one place makes it easier to spot all the new introductions and see the kitchen and bath trends at KBIS as they unfold.  With flat, comfy shoes on my feet I raced down the aisles to see what I could during the time I was not attending media tours.  Here are my trend observations:

The Top 5 Kitchen and Bath Trends at KBIS 2015

  • Universal Design
  • Micro Living
  • Grey Tones are Warming Up
  • Tech in the Home
  • Purposeful Storage
  • Personalization/Customization

Universal Design

The aging in place consumer accounts for 55% of total income earned domestically, and kitchen/bath brands and manufacturers have come to the realization that this demographic is continuing to grow.  Because of this, there has been a huge shift in the industry and more attention is being paid to universal design – design that is accessible to everyone, including the elderly and those with disabilities.  I, too recently joined the bandwagon by getting my CAPS (Certified Aging in Place Specialist) designation and am now equipped with the knowledge to design spaces that are beautiful yet still meet the needs for the aging consumer.  Design modifications can include a zero entry, curbless shower, grab bars (that don’t look they belong in a nursing home) or lighting that is strategically placed in the home. Some of the products seen at KBIS that were geared to the universal design consumer included shower seating, accessible hand showers, drop down cabinets, wall hung vanities,  and an emphasis on illuminated cabinetry.   TOTO Usa - Universal Design, KBIS2015 | Cozy Stylish Chic
TotoUSA showed a curbless entry shower with enough space to accommodate a wheelchair (if needed), decorative grab bars strategically placed along the walls and at varying heights,  a shower bench, and a hand shower that is accessible at varying heights .  Having had ankle surgery a while back where I was in a cast and unable to navigate the bathroom with the ease that I was accustomed to for several months, I know all too well that universal design not only addresses the aging place consumer, but it can also address those with  temporary injuries.  When we’re able, we never think of the obstacles one might face later on down the road, but having experienced it first hand, it is amazing to see how these slight modifications can make such a difference.  Toto USA ADA height counter | Cozy Stylish Chic TotoUSA also showed an ADA counter height vanity with enough clearance down below to ensure that those in wheelchairs can comfortably reach the faucet.  The wide spread faucet features levered handles, making it easier for the aging in place consumer to turn off and on.  TotoUSA makes sure that that one need not sacrifice style for accessibility.

Micro Living

Taking our cues from Europe, where space is at a premium, micro living is another rapidly growing market.  This past June while attending Dwell on Design, I noticed that manufacturers were placing quite an emphasis on stylish solutions for small spaces.   You may remember my post on trends at Dwell on Design this past June where GE industrial designer Lou Lenzi unveiled the GE prototype micro-kitchen.  If not, it’s worth a look!

Bosch-KBIS-micro living

At KBIS, Bosch unveiled their version of the micro kitchen.  Very different than GE’s prototype modular micro-kitchen, Bosch’s interpretation look very much like the same appliances we are accustomed to, only minified.
TOTO Usa - KBIS-Micro living

When space is at a premium, wall hung toilets and vanities are the way to go.  Toto USA shows us above with their interpretation of a micro-bath. A wall hung toilet can save several inches of valuable space by utilizing a tank that is installed within the wall.  Many wonder how the tank is accessible if it is installed within the wall and one of the biggest fears is how accessible is the tank should there be a leak or the tank need servicing.  It’s actually quite easy – the flush plate which sits on the wall above the toilet is removable and behind sits the opening to the tank, where all the tank mechanisms are easily accessible.  Having wall hung toilets and vanities also offer another advantage in addition to added space – easier cleaning!

Warmer Tones of Grey

Grey and brown are morphing to the point where it is hard to tell if it’s a greyer brown or a browner grey, if that makes sense.  Clean, crisp, cool grey as we once knew it is giving way to a much warmer and more inviting grey/brown.

Walker Zanger - KBIS-Sterling Row  | Cozy Stylish Chic

Walker Zanger hit one out of the park with their recent introductions.  The Sterling Row collection, inspired by tailored menswear and features  warmer grey tones of wood textured porcelain paired with white marble in a variety of patterns.  This collection also  won Walker Zanger 1st place in the Best of KBIS/Bath category. You can see why in the photo above, which features “Buckle”, also from the Sterling Row collection.  p.s. – Stay tuned for more from Walker Zanger in a later post – they had quite a few noteworthy introductions. Wood-Mode - KBIS2015 | Cozy Stylish Chic

Wood-Mode shows off maple cabinetry  in a grey-brown stain with a creamy white glaze. The result is warm, but still fresh,  and a finish that works well with a variety of styles. This warmer grey/almost brown tone is the color du jour in cabinetry, and every manufacturer at KBIS included some variation of this color.  Get used to this color, as we’ll be seeing a lot of it in the near future and soon all the cool painted grey cabinetry that we’ve been overloaded with on Pinterest will be a distant memory…

Tech in the Home

There’s no escaping tech in the home – it is here to stay, and more and more I’m starting to realize that soon I’ll be able to control everything in the home from my desk, sofa, or even from across the world .  From iOS and Android operated thermostats, lights and ovens to robot vacuum cleaners and no-touch toilets, we are getting closer than you think to the home of the future that those of us Gen X’ers once viewed on “The Jetsons” and imagined “if only we could have our own Rosie to do our mundane housework…”, when we were children.

One of the more innovative introductions that I saw at market was Tech Top by LG Hausys, a wireless charging surface that can be is embedded into any Hi-Macs or Viatera solid surface.  Hi-Macs is a durable eco-friendly solid surface that is used for countertops and is resistant to heat, scratches and stains.  Viatera is 93% natural quartz stone that is blended with advanced polymer resins,  and colorfast pigments.  How it works is that a LG Hausys certified fabricator will rout out the back surface, after which he embeds the Tech Top transmitter beneath the surface.  The AC adapter is then plugged in and your cell phone can be charged without wires simply by placing it directly above the transmitter!  The only drawback is that only one device can be charged at a time, but I’m sure that it’s only a matter of time before multiple devices will be able to be charged simultaneously. Tech Top also won Best of KBIS in the Best of Show Category.  See the video below to see how it works.

Cabinetry has come a long way and long gone are the days of the cabinet doors getting in the way.  I’ve seen cabinet doors that open up and out of the way with a gentle touch of a button, but nothing as sleek and sexy as Bauformat‘s most recent introduction.  See it in action below:

Coffee and Espresso machines have been all the rage as of late.  Why spend money at Starbuck’s when you can make yourself a cup of joe at home for next to nothing (unless, of course,  you use Illy beans)?  Over the last few years we’ve seen several of the higher end appliance lines come up with built in wall coffee systems,  but GE is the first to integrate a coffee system into the refrigerator with  the GE Café Series Refrigerator with Keurig K-Cup Brewing System.  Because it is integrated into the refrigerator,  wall and counter space can be used for other things, like perhaps to charge your cell phone on the Tech Top charging station mentioned above.

GE Café French Door with Keurig coffee brewer | Cozy Stylish Chic

Image via GE Appliances

 

Customization/Personalization

Cabinetry can now be customized for a  specific use or specific items to be stored.  We can now tailor each space to suit our individual needs and no longer are we seeing large empty spaces within our drawers and cabinets.  Cabinetry is now meticulously designed so that each item has a designated place, keeping our items organized and our lives in check.

Wood-Mode wine storage-KBIS 2015 | Cozy Stylish Chic

Wood-Mode offers specialized storage for wine bottles in their beautiful walnut lined drawers. No more rolling bottles!

For the person who loves to entertain, a dedicated beverage bar by Wood-Mode might be in order.


Wood-Mode KBIS 2015 | Cozy Stylish Chic

One side houses a built in Miele coffee system…

Wood-Mode wine bar-KBIS 2015 | Cozy Stylish Chic

And the other side houses bottles of wine and everything else that goes along with enjoying a nice bottle of wine.  The unit built above doesn’t show a built in wine and beverage refrigerator, but that’s what I would put it.  Because it’s custom, and you deserve to have it any way you want it.

Wood-Mode storage-KBIS 2015 | Cozy Stylish Chic

Wood-Mode also offers specialized storage for  rolls of tin foil and plastic wrap – brilliant!  Let’s face it – the only reason we keep the boxes that the rolls come in, is so that we can tear off the sheets that are needed.  They are a pain and get stuck when opening and closing the drawers.  With a built-in serrated edge lid, there is no need for the unsightly boxes and the interiors of the drawer are just as beautiful as the exterior. And if that isn’t enough, organizational inserts from companies such as Häfele or Rev-A-Shelf can also be incorporated for maximum personalization.

Robern-bathroom storage-KBIS2015 | Cozy Stylish Chic

In the bathroom, Robern‘s M-Series electrical cabinets provide electrical outlets (convenient for those of you who use an electric toothbrush), a mirror defogger, USB charging, a magnetic panel to store items such as tweezers and nail clippers, storage for glasses/razor.  There is even a model that has an integrated tv on the mirror. As a result, the bathroom counters are clutter free and easier to clean.

Also seen at KBIS – felt lined drawers and illuminated drawers to house fine silverware and cabinetry specially designed for our furry, four legged friends. In this day and age, customization is key and manufacturers are making sure that the consumer’s needs are met by constantly evolving as our tastes and desires change.

BlogTourVegas

The above observations are my own, but I urge you to take a look at what my fellow BlogTourVegas mates have written about their experiences at KBIS.  Seeing the show from multiple viewpoints is the best way to get a bigger overview of what the show was all about. Links to their blogs and websites are listed below.

BlogTourVegas-Bloggers | Cozy Stylish Chic

It’s much more than just kitchen and bath trends at KBIS, so stay tuned for more KBIS coverage in the upcoming weeks.

Jeanne Chung signature

 

Behind the Scenes at The Steven S. Koblik Education and Visitor Center at The Huntington

 

Artist rendering of the entrance to the Steven S. Koblik Education and Visitor Center, opening April 2015 at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. Architectural Resources Group and Office of Cheryl Barton, © Art Zendarski.

Artist rendering of the entrance to the Steven S. Koblik Education and Visitor Center, opening April 2015 at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. Architectural Resources Group and Office of Cheryl Barton, © Art Zendarski.

The Steven S. Koblik Education and Visitor Center at The Huntington

The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens opened the front portion of the new education and visitor center January 14, first to The Society of Fellows members and select members of the press, and later to the general public.  In addition to the $68 million raised for the project, which broke ground April 2013, an additional $10 million was raised in endowment to fund future maintenance.

The project was officially named in June 2014 in honor of Huntington President Steven S. Koblik,  and the architectural structures designed by Architectural Resources Group and the surrounding gardens and landscaping by the Office of Cheryl Barton. The scale of the project is large, and the challenge was to design a garden where buildings would feel like a natural part of the landscape.  Instead of building one larger building, several smaller buildings were built and interlaced with walkways and loggias. Located in San Marino, just north-east of downtown Los Angeles, the temperate Mediterranean-like climate allows for outdoor walkways year round.  As a matter of fact,  the day I strolled through the gardens it was a crisp 65 degrees with clear blue sky.

Map of the Steven S. Koblik Education and Visitor Center, The Huntington

Map of the Steven S. Koblik Education and Visitor Center, opening April 2015 at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. Architectural Resources Group and Office of Cheryl Barton, © Art Zendarski.

Map of the Steven S. Koblik Education and Visitor Center, opening April 2015 at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. Architectural Resources Group and Office of Cheryl Barton, © Art Zendarski.

The Front Portion of the Steven S. Koblik Education and Visitor Center Opens to the Public

The front portion of the Steven S. Koblik Education and Visitor Center at the Huntington Library opened January 14 at noon, and I happened to be there 2 hours prior to opening to attend a press preview of the just-completed front portion as well as a hard-hat tour of the construction site that will open later this spring.

The newly opened front portion of the Steven S. Koblik Education and Visitor Center consists of an Entrance Façade, an Admissions and Membership building, a Coffee Shop, The Huntington Store, and the Avery and Andy Barth Family Grove.

The Entrance Façade

Entrance to the Huntington Library

New entrance at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. Photo: Tim Street-Porter.

The Admissions and Membership Building and Coffee Shop

Huntington Library-Admissions Building and Coffee Shop

New admissions and membership building at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens; New coffee shop at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. Photos: Tim Street-Porter.

The Huntington Store

The Huntington Store boasts 5,000 square feet of retail space that caters to every visitor, young and old.  There is a vast and varied selection of books, stationery,  apparel, jewelry and home decor – all related to The Huntington’s extensive library, art, and botanical collections.

The Huntington Store-rendering

Artist rendering of the Huntington Store, in the Steven S. Koblik Education and Visitor Center at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. Architectural Resources Group and Office of Cheryl Barton, © Art Zendarski.

 

The vaulted sky-lit central area is bright and inviting, and brings the outdoors in. San Marino/Pasadena can be quite conservative and those who reside here tend to look to classical architecture and design for inspiration in their own homes.  Because of this I was pleased to see that although the simplified lines may seem somewhat contemporary,  the overall design is based on classical architecture and is in fact a modern interpretation of the Gothic cathedral.  Similar to the layout of the Gothic cathedral, The Huntington Store houses  a central nave, clerestory windows have been replaced with an overhead sky light, transepts (which in this case house each of the thematic rooms), and an ambulatory which showcases a collection of porcelain vases at the rear of the store.  Brilliant interpretation, I’d say!

Huntington Library Store

The Huntington Store shortly after opening to the public. Photo: Jeanne Chung

The Childrens Nook at The Huntington Store

The children’s nook in the Huntington Store at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. Photo: Tim Street-Porter

The whimsical, carved wooden tree that extends from floor to ceiling in the center of the children’s nook and recalls “The Giving Tree”, a children’s classic by Shel Silverstein, and will be a sure hit with the youngest visitors at The Huntington.

The Avery and Andy Barth Family Grove

Huntington Library Courtyard

Steven S. Koblik, President of The Huntington Library, Collections, and Botanical Gardens, gives his opening remarks. Photo: Jeanne Chung; Avery and Andy Barth Family Grove. Photo: Tim Street-Porter.

The Family Courtyard at The Huntington

The Avery and Andy Barth Family Grove at The Huntington. Photo: Jeanne Chung

A central courtyard is framed by a U-shaped loggia and connects the three newly opened buildings, much like in the manner of Myron Hunt, the architect of the original Huntington Beaux Art estate completed in 1911, which currently houses The Huntington Art Gallery on the property.  I must say that I felt very at home in this courtyard, as it felt very familiar to me.  I attended a school in town where the buildings were designed by Myron Hunt in 1907, and much like The Avery and Andy Barth Family Grove, there was (and still is) a central courtyard surrounded by a series of buildings all connected by outdoor, covered walkways. This central courtyard was also a central gathering place where students ate lunch, graduations were held, and people sat around between classes to absorb the warmth of the Southern California sun.

The Gardens

According to landscape architect Cheryl Barton, the concept of the gardens was “choreographed at a micro and macro scale simultaneously and is designed to be intuitive and move with the landscape and topography”.

The Huntington Garden

Garden at The Huntington. Photo: Jeanne Chung

Garden at The Huntington

Garden at the Huntington. Photo: Jeanne Chung

Huntington Cafe View

View to The Huntington Art Gallery from the Dining Terrace. Photo: Jeanne Chung

The Huntington Cafe View

Artist rendering of the café terrace in the Steven S. Koblik Education and Visitor Center, opening April 2015 at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. Architectural Resources Group and Office of Cheryl Barton, © Art Zendarski.

When construction is complete, the view to Henry Huntington’s home (now the Art Gallery) will resemble the rendering above. Water will run through the colorful contemporary perennial garden, named the Celebration Garden Steve Rogers in memory of his wife Janet Rogers, and will serve as a place to pause and reflect before transitioning  from the Education and Visitor Center at The Huntington to the different themed gardens and beyond to the historic core of the property.

The Café

The Cafe will offer a variety of food options, including a salad station, pasta station, and a feature station which will have a daily theme related to different areas in the garden.  Think sushi, in reference to the Japanese Garden, or perhaps Southwestern cuisine, in reference to the Desert Garden.

Huntington Cafe

The Café at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. Photo: Jeanne Chung

 The Stewart R. Smith Board Room

Huntington Library Board Room

Stewart R. Smith Board Room. Photo: Jeanne Chung

When completed, the Stewart R. Smith Board Room will seat 50 people around one central table. Two sources of daylight, via a wall of windows on one side and a skylight clerestory along the back wall,  will balance the amount of light in the room and will provide the perfect amount of illumination for the mural that will fit into the space (now occupied by plywood in the photo above) above the white oak wainscoting.  This mural, depicting a pastoral California landscape, was originally painted for the Fred H. and Bessie Ranke residence in the Hollywood Hills by celebrated California artist Millard Sheets in 1934, and is one of four major works of art donated to The Huntington that will be included in this project.

Below is the Millard Sheets mural shown in its original location before it was removed and restored.

Millard Sheets mural-Huntington Board Room

Millard Sheets, Mural for the Home of Fred H. and Bessie Ranke, 1934. Gift of Larry McFarland and M. Todd Williamson. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. Photo: Tim Street-Porter © The Huntington

Rothenberg Hall

The lobby of Rothenberg Hall will be the new home to  Bicentennial Tapestries, a series of six tapestries  by Alexander Calder and part of an edition of 200 produced by the Aubusson factory in France in 1975 to celebrate America’s bicentennial.  Below is one of these six tapestries gifted to The Huntington by the Berman Bloch Family.

Calder Bicentennial Tapestries

Alexander Calder, Bicentennial Tapestries, 1975, wool, each 41 x 59 in. Gift of the Berman Bloch Family. Copyright © 2015 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

Huntington Library Theater-work in progress

Rothenberg Hall. Photo: Jeanne Chung

Rothenberg Hall is a state of the art auditorium and will host The Huntington’s program of lectures, conferences, and performances. The photo above shows the white oak panels which will line the walls of the 400-seat auditorium and is a subtle reference to the original white oak panels used in Henry Huntington’s residence and is also used in several other spaces throughout the visitor center.

Rothenberg Hall-Huntington Library

Artist rendering of Rothenberg Hall in the Steven S. Koblik Education and Visitor Center, opening April 2015 at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. Architectural Resources Group and Office of Cheryl Barton, © Art Zendarski.

The Rose Hills Foundation Garden Court

The 36 foot glass dome structure acts as the focal point of the visitor center, and at the four supporting corners will be a collection of palms and tropical plantings.  This central area will act as an informal lobby for the lecture hall, multi-purpose room, and classrooms.  What you do not see in these photos, but is a major portion of the project is the 46,000 square feet of underground storage that was added to house the Huntington’s growing collections of original historical research materials.  This underground storage extends from the visitor center on the east and is connected to the Munger Research Center on the West via an underground tunnel. Waterproofing was of extreme importance because of the historical significance of the rare books, manuscripts, photographs and documents stored underground.   Extreme precautions were made to ensure the safety of these invaluable  treasures …and also to satisfy the insurers.

Glass Dome at The Huntington

The Rose Hills Foundation Garden Court. Photo: Jeanne Chung

Rose Hills Foundation Garden Court - in progress

Rose Hills Foundation Garden Court. Photo: Jeanne Chung

Rose Hills Foundation Garden Court rendering - Huntington Library

Artist rendering of the garden court and central garden in the Steven S. Koblik Education and Visitor Center, opening April 2015 at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. Architectural Resources Group and Office of Cheryl Barton, © Art Zendarski

The June and Merle Banta Education Center

I didn’t quite catch a great shot of the courtyard which sits in the middle of the four educational classrooms, but I did catch everyone staring at something of great importance.  That something is currently a blank wall, but will soon be the home of the  Mutual Savings and Loan Mural, a ceramic mural measuring just over 8 by 12 feet that consists of thousands of hand-formed rectangles, all glazed in warm shades or red, by mid century, African-American ceramicist Doyle Lane.

Huntington Library-June and Merle Banta Education Center

The June and Merle Banta Education Center. Photo: Jeanne Chung

The acquisition of this work couldn’t come at a more opportune appropriate time, as lately I have been seeing a renewed interest in mid century ceramic works in the world of art and interior design.

Doyle Lane - Mutual Savings and Loan Mural

Doyle Lane, Mutual Savings and Loan Mural, 1964, clay, 18 × 18 ft, as installed at Reform Gallery, Los Angeles, 2014. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. Photo: Joshua White. © The Huntington

The fourth major work of art to be displayed the The Huntington is Jerusalem Stabile, by Alexander Calder.  The bright, red metal sculpture, which measures 24 feet across, is on loan from the Calder Foundation, New York and will welcome visitors to The Huntington just to the west of the Admissions building beginning this spring.

Jerusalem Stabile, Alexander Calder

Alexander Calder, Jerusalem Stabile, 1976, sheet metal, bolts, and paint, 141 × 288 × 143 in., at the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, in 2014. Calder Foundation, New York; gift of the Philip and Muriel Berman Foundation to the Calder Foundation, 2005. Copyright © 2015 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

The Steven S. Koblik Education and Visitor Center at The Huntington along with the four recently acquired  works of art marks a pivotal point for The Huntington Library, Art Collection, and Botanical Gardens.  I’ve always associated The Huntington  with 17th century Italian sculpture and portrait paintings dating well before WWII,  and most even earlier than that. Gainsborough’s Blue Boy and Thomas Lawrence’s Pinkie  are usually what come to mind, especially having attended several field trips to The Huntington as a child.  However, this is the first time that I have seen such a significant shift to more contemporary, post WWII art – and I’m liking it.  A lot.   A big kudos to The Huntington and those associated with the design of the Education and Visitor Center for bringing together the past with the present in a harmonious space for all to enjoy.

Jeanne Chung signature

Master the Art of Stylish and Organized Kitchen Drawers in 2015 with Poggenpohl

Poggenpohl - slate grey finish

Poggenpohl

Every January, homeowners around the globe look to reorganize their lives, and one of the first places they turn to is their kitchen drawers.  Let’s face it – organized kitchen drawers are what every homeowner strives for, but very few achieve because most drawers are designed simply for storage and not necessarily with organization in mind.  Each drawer cavity is usually one open space into which a variety of items are placed.  However, when the drawers are pulled open abruptly or slammed shut, items tend to shift around and after time, become one jumbled mess. Actually, when you look behind the drawer fronts and cabinet doors, the kitchen is probably the most disorganized room in the home, but it doesn’t have to be. [Read more…]

3 Must-Have Luxury Kitchen Appliances from Thermador

Thermador Freedom Induction Range via cozystylishchic.com

Luxury Kitchen Appliances from Thermador

In less than two weeks I will be headed to Las Vegas with Modenus’ BlogTour for the Kitchen & Bath Industry Show (KBIS)  January 20-22 where I will be seeing and experiencing the latest in kitchen and bath products and trends.   Thermador , the nearly 100-year-old company that has been “bringing innovation to the kitchen for real cooks” since its founding in 1916, is one of the sponsors of this adventure.  Thermador is a pioneer in the luxury kitchen appliance industry, having introduced the first wall oven and cooktop in 1947 as well as being the first to introduce stainless steel to the home appliance industry that same year.

Of all the luxury kitchen appliances I will be seeing at KBIS, there are three Thermador products that I am particularly excited about experiencing in person:

The Freedom Induction Cooktop

The Freedom Induction Cooktop is the first full-surface induction appliance with the flexibility of a natural-mapping user interface.  This technology  recognizes cookware size, shape and position, and delivers heat to these targeted areas, leaving all other areas not in contact with a cooking vessel to remain cool.  This is definitely advantageous to the home chef like myself, whose super size All Clad paella and oval fish pans are much larger than the burner, resulting in many spots that do not receive heat, especially when using two side by side burners simultaneously. The Freedom Induction Cooktop can accommodate pans of different shapes and sizes as large as 13″ x 21″.  It  delivers even heat, no matter the size and shape and also offers all the benefits of traditional induction technology, including instantaneous and precise temperature control.  A recently added innovation is  PowerBoost™, a feature that boils water faster than any other technology in its class.  When you’re constantly pressed for time like I am, every minute counts!

[Read more…]