Luxury Cabinetry- A Modern Heart and Historic Soul

Luxury cabinetry -Ruskin by Rutt Cabinetry

image via Rutt Cabinetry

Luxury Cabinetry by Rutt at the AD Home Design Show

On our 3rd day in New York, BlogTourNYC visited with luxury cabinetry manufacturer, Rutt Cabinetry at the Architectural Digest Home Design Show.  There, we sat down sipping  on espresso à la modes (compliments of Miele’s CM5200 coffee machine-Mmmmm!) while we listened to luxury kitchen and cabinetry designer Scott Stultz speak to us about his inspiration behind the Ruskin Series, which was making its debut at the show.  Stultz’s talk on architecture, design, theory and the ideas of the late tastemaker, art/architecture critic,  and modern thinker – John Ruskin  proved to be one of the most inspirational moments for me during BlogTourNYC.

Founded in 1951 by Phares Rutt in Goodville, Pennsylvania, the Rutt Handcrafted Cabinetry name has been synonymous with luxury cabinetry and high end traditional style since its inception, and has since expanded their line to also include contemporary styles.  Ruskin is Rutt Cabinetry’s first major product introduction in over a decade.  Instead of novelty and a short shelf life, the company wanted a deeper, lasting relevance that would outlast trends.  The Ruskin Series is inspired by the ideals of John Ruskin, with history and strong design principles playing a large role in the design.  More importantly, the Ruskin Series is designed to capture our attention by speaking to our emotions.

Scott Stultz, Luxury Cabinetry Designer of Ruskin

Designer Scott Stultz

The Ruskin Series by Rutt Cabinetry

Stultz then took us through his deep investigation into the history of architecture.  He asked the question: “What makes these architectural styles speak to our primal and intellectual needs?”He explained that it is the tension between our primal and intellectual needs and how these two needs work together  that create the alchemy of beauty and function.  A few of the design intricacies of the Ruskin series that speak to our needs and create the beauty and function that is the Ruskin series:

1) a door profile that is designed so that diffused light creates strong shadows and layers.

Luxury cabinetry -Ruskin by Rutt Cabinetry

Luxury cabinetry -Ruskin by Rutt Cabinetry

2)  The vertical and horizontal mullions are purposely designed so that they are slightly different sizes.  The horizontals represent gravity and stability and the verticals, ascension and grace.

Luxury cabinetry -Ruskin by Rutt Cabinetry

image via Rutt Cabinetry

3)  The contemporary stainless details on the hood follow the lines of the troughs above. So subtle, but very well thought out to create visual  balance and proportion.

Luxury cabinetry -Hood molding-Ruskin by Rutt Cabinetry

image via Rutt Cabinetry

4)  The corner posts have no turnings and are instead replaced with a long stretch of elliptical profile, resulting in a warm and inviting profile.

Luxury cabinetry -Corner post - Ruskin by Rutt Cabinetry

Luxury cabinetry -Ruskin Island detail

image via Rutt Cabinetry

5)  The door front of the pull front drawer with recessed walnut pull follows the line of the adjacent corner post, resulting in a more cohesive and inviting appearance.

Luxury cabinetry -Ruskin Cove Drawer

image via Rutt Cabinetry

6)  Elliptical based arcs instead of circular based arcs are used in the design details, as elliptical arcs are more dynamic and less predictable.

Luxury cabinetry - Elliptical based arcs - Ruskin by Rutt Cabinetry

7)  The luxury cabinetry details in the drawer interiors are meticulously designed to more than satisfy the most discriminating desire for form and function.

Luxury cabinetry - Ruskin-by-Rutt-Drawer-Interiors

For their booth at the Architectural Digest Home Design Show, Rutt Cabinetry partnered with Miele, Franke, Bastille Metalworks, Grothouse, Studio DUNN, and Emeco.  Below, the Ruskin “Appliance Armoire” is shown with Brilliant White appliances from Miele’s Generation 6000 PureLine series, where the white underneath the glass softens the lines of the rift cut white oak in a Keswick oak finish and makes everything appear “lighter and friendlier”. Also, if you notice on the right side of the appliance armoire below, the mullions are segmented differently on the top than on the bottom.  This is one of the detailed intricacies that make Ruskin so special – a visual push/pull tension results in a more dynamic design.

Luxury cabinetry - Ruskin Appliance Armoire

image via Rutt Cabinetry

A stainless steel Franke sink and Grothouse wood countertop – the perfect complement to the creamy white cabinetry that surrounds it.

Luxury cabinetry - Franke sink and Ruskin by Rutt

Franke sink with Grothouse wood countertop

The beautifully textured cast zinc kitchen island countertop emitted a warm, pebbly glow when viewed at an angle.  This was the first time I viewed a cast zinc countertop installed, and I must say that Bastille Metalworks did a phenomenal job and I wouldn’t mind having one installed in my own kitchen.

A cast zinc counter top by Bastille Metalworks

A cast zinc counter top by Bastille Metalworks

And some more images of the Ruskin series…

Luxury cabinetry - Ruskin by Rutt Cabinetry

image via Rutt Cabinetry

Luxury cabinetry - Ruskin by Rutt Cabinetry

image via Rutt Cabinetry

In order for the consumer to connect with a brand, they must be able to effectively tell their story by capturing their attention and connect on an emotional level, and the passion and conviction in Scott Stultz’s storytelling accomplished just that.   I am not easily swayed, but passionate storytelling and the product to back the story definitely does it for me. The Ruskin Series is not modern, nor is it traditional. The next time I remodel my kitchen, Rutt Cabinetry will be the first company I will look at, as their belief in superior craftsmanship, beauty, and enduring relevance parallel my own design ideals.  As Stultz so eloquently phrased it: “Ruskin is luxury cabinetry with a modern  heart and a historic soul”

Please note that Rutt Cabinetry was one of several sponsors of BlogTourNYC, which covered my travel and expenses during my stay in New York.  No compensation was received for this post and all opinions expressed are my own.

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The 2014 Pasadena Showcase House

Watercolor rendering of the 2014 Pasadena Showcase House by Joseph Stoddard

Watercolor rendering of the 2014 Pasadena Showcase House by Joseph Stoddard

The 2014 Pasadena Showcase House

Last week, I had the opportunity to preview the 2014 Pasadena Showcase House as a member of the media before it opened to the public this past Sunday. This year the Pasadena Showcase House celebrates their Golden Anniversary – 50 years and the biggest and oldest running show house in the country!  Growing up in Pasadena, I have attended for as long as I can remember – about the past 30+ years!

The 2014 Pasadena Showcase House, a 1915 English Arts and Crafts estate,  was built in 1915 by Stiles O. Clements, who designed many notable buildings in the area, including the El Capitan Theatre, the Wiltern Theater, and the Adamson House in Malibu.  The estate occupies 3.5 acres overlooking the Arroyo and features 7 bedrooms, 10 bathrooms, 5 fireplaces, a river rock spring house (now converted into a wine cellar), a greenhouse, a potting shed, a tennis court, pool including bathhouse with two poolside changing rooms, a carriage house, and much, much more!

This year’s Showcase house consists of 25 designers from Pasadena and other outlying areas.  There was so much to see – much more than I could possibly post.  Besides, I am only going to show a few snippets to whet your appetite so that you’ll come and see the house in person, because it really needs to be seen in person to appreciate the true beauty and scale of the estate.

Pasadena Showcase House 2014-6

The grandiose front door entrance

Upon approaching the front door, I was greeted by a beautiful porch and grand entry hall.  The entry hall was lined with paneling, and placed in key spots around the room were marble busts – a trend that I recently saw at High Point Market and is now making its way into homes around the country.

Powder Room by Whitcomb-Hughes Design +Build

Powder Room by Whitcomb-Hughes Design +Build

Off of the entry hall was a Powder Room, painted in a bold chartreuse and outfitted with gold accents and fixtures – also an important trend that I have been seeing lately. I particularly loved the modern, almost organic shape of the faucet handles.

2014 Pasadena Showcase House -Dining Room by Michael Berman Limited

Dining Room by Michael Berman Limited

Next, I entered the dining room, designed by Michael Berman, who incorporated an eclectic and worldly mix of antiques and pieces from his own personal collection, including embroidered linen and silk drapery from his signature line for Kravet. The mitered detailing in the platinum grass cloth on the ceiling was to die for.

2014 Pasadena Showcase House-The Salon by John Cole Interior Design, Inc.

The Salon by John Cole Interior Design

Before its most recent transformation, The Salon was outfitted with dark wood paneling and had very little light.  Now  it is large, sun-drenched and used as living room, separated into three distinct sitting areas where intimate conversations could be had simultaneously while entertaining.    The room combines soothing neutrals and mixed metals, and Asian artifacts are used throughout.  The use of glass and lucite pedestals and accent tables throughout gives this room a fresh, contemporary edge.

2014 Pasadena Showcase House-The Salon by John Cole Interior Design, Inc.

The Salon by John Cole Interior Design, Inc.

2014 Pasadena Showcase House-The Great Room by Kathryne Designs, Inc.

The Great Room by Kathryne Designs, Inc.

The Great Room is what I picture when I think of traditional Pasadena design.  Arts and Crafts inspired with dark wood flooring and large stenciled beams above. A more relaxed room than the adjacent Salon, there are two distinct seating areas and a newly added wet bar which is perfect for casual entertaining.

The Staircase and Upstairs Gallery is painted in a rich chocolate brown and the lighting that shines on the marble busts brings out the highlights and shadows reminiscent of chiaroscuro (the strong contrast between light and dark in painting), and  reminds me of being in the gallery at the Huntington Library that houses Gainsborough’s Blue Boy and Pinky. (Sorry I don’t have a picture – you’ll just have to come and see for yourself!)

2014 Pasadena Showcase House-Sitting area in the Master Suite by Designs of the Interior

Sitting area in the Master Suite by Designs of the Interior

The Master Suite was cleverly reconfigured to to accommodate a king size bed.  The original opening was in the center of the room, and with the wall being divided in two, a king size bed was not possible.  A subtle mix of metallic finishes – weathered brass, pearlized grey, platinum leaf,  along with the sheen of the drapery and bed linens add a touch of glamour to the room.

2014 Pasadena Showcase House-Master Suite by Designs of the Interior

Master Suite by Designs of the Interior

Upon walking into the Bath of the Master Suite, I instantly recognized the Walker Zanger mosaic tile from the Tangent Collection that was recently featured in my friend Brandon Smith’s newly launched magazine, The twentySIX.  I thought that the picture in Brandon’s magazine looked good, but it looks incredible when done in a larger area and the repeat of the tile can truly be appreciated.

The Laundry Room designed by Erika Bruder was situated on the second floor and offered a modern approach to a traditional space.  A farm house sink, but the size and proportion was much more modern and streamlined than the farmhouse sinks I am accustomed to seeing. I’m always a fan when a designer is sensitive to the space  is able to transform a room while taking into consideration the original architecture .

2014 Pasadena Showcase House - Young Woman's Suite by Alicia Friedmann Interior Design, LLC

Young Woman’s Suite by Alicia Friedmann Interior Design, LLC

The Young Woman’s Suite and adjoining bath is outfitted in the most calming color palette – a soft baby blue (reminiscent of Benjamin Moore’s Color of the Year, “Breath of Fresh Air”)  And a breath of fresh air is indeed what this suite is.  Clean, sophisticated, and very Pasadena.

2014 Pasadena Showcase House-World Traveler's Suite by Amy DeVault Design, Inc.

World Traveler’s Suite by Amy DeVault Design, Inc.

2014 Pasadena Showcase House-World Traveler's Suite by Amy DeVault Design, Inc.

World Traveler’s Suite by Amy DeVault Design, Inc.

The World Traveler’s Suite is reminiscent of a suite in a high end luxury hotel- beautifully appointed with luxurious linens, accessories, and finishes throughout.  I especially loved herringbone patterned floor and the side by side  Gessi faucets and trough sink in the bath.

2014 Pasadena Showcase House - Media/Game Room by JTID, Inc.

Media/Game Room by JTID, Inc.

JTID spared no expense on the details in the Media/Game Room.  Young, contemporary, a little bit eclectic, yet still very sophisticated with an assortment of high end finishes and textures.  I was especially fond of the art on the wall and the unique Mid-Century inspired light fixture that extended from floor to ceiling.

2014 Pasadena Showcase House-Nursery by A. Peltier Interiors Inc.

Nursery by A. Peltier Interiors Inc.

The Nursery and adjoining Bath, designed by A. Peltier Interiors Inc., was a charming and sophisticated room for the baby.  Not too cute, but not to serious, it had the same beautiful combination of pale aqua and coral that I recently saw at High Point Market and can easily be made more grown up at a later date by simply swapping out some of the furnishings and accessories, or the wallpaper in the bath. Practical and thinking ahead – I like that!

2014 Pasadena Showcase House-Nursery Bath by A. Peltier Interiors Inc.

Nursery Bath by A. Peltier Interiors Inc.

2014 Pasadena Showcase House-Back Staircase by L2 Interiors

Back Staircase by L2 Interiors

I loved the texture against the wall in the back staircase by L2 Interiors. The choice of lighting – perfect for the space.

2014 Pasadena Showcase House-Nanny's Room by Ederra Design Studio

2014 Pasadena Showcase House-Nanny’s Room by Ederra Design Studio

The Nanny’s Room, designed by the dynamic duo of Ederra Studio, is drastically different than the modern loft they designed for Dwell Labs last year.  Again, they did not disappoint, as they have a strong pulse on what is important to Pasadenans and kept true to the architecture of the home.

2014 Pasadena Showcase House-Nanny's Room by Ederra Design Studio

Nanny’s Room by Ederra Design Studio

2014 Pasdena Showcase House-Today's Kitchen by Cynthia Bennet & Associates, Inc.

Today’s Kitchen by Cynthia Bennet & Associates, Inc.

Today’s Kitchen was transformed from several smaller spaces in which walls were removed to make way for an open space that is more conducive to the way today’s families live.

2014 Pasadena Showcase House-Today's Kitchen by Cynthia Bennet & Associates, Inc.

Today’s Kitchen by Cynthia Bennet & Associates, Inc.

2014 Pasadena Showcase House-Today's Kitchen by Cynthia Bennet and Associates

Today’s Kitchen by Cynthia Bennet and Associates

I love that modern technology was integrated into the kitchen with the addition of Top Brewer’s Scanomat.  I recently tested this high end coffee machine and beverage dispenser at the Architectural Digest Home Design Show in New York and love that you can brew your customized drink of choice remotely via a Smart Phone.  Now if only it could deliver drinks bedside…

2014 Pasadena Showcase House-Pool by Pacific Outdoor Living

Pool by Pacific Outdoor Living

The jacuzzi and fountain are centered along the same axis as the pool. The raised coping around the pool adds a sense of drama and presence to the space.

2014 Pasadena Showcase House - Lily Pond and Terrace Garden

Lily Pond by The Pond Company, Dan Gromer Landscaping, Terraced Garden by Sacred Space Garden Design, Inc.

The Terraced Garden showcases a variety of xeric (water wise/drought tolerant) plants.  Living in California, where we have been experiencing a water shortage, we are all sensitive to the environment and do what we can to conserve water.  The fact that it is visually stunning is an added bonus.  The plantings were chosen to offer a variety of color, texture, and balance to the existing hardscape – the original traditional herringbone patterned brick walkway and concrete steps.

2014 Pasadena Showcase House-The Carriage House by Tocco Finale

The Carriage House by Tocco Finale

A trip to the back of the property to the Carriage House was a pleasant surprise.  The space was beautifully layered with artifacts from around the globe – a Zebra hide laid on the herringbone patterned wood floor, stone carved Buddha heads on the console,  a pair of antique chairs upholstered in a classic Greek key motif.  There was so much to look at that had I not been told, I would not have looked up and would have missed the collection of Moroccan pendants that hung from the raised ceiling above.

2014 Pasadena Showcase House-Creekside Spring House by Mystic Water Gardens

Creekside Spring House by Mystic Water Gardens

Last but not least, the 100 year old Creekside Spring House constructed of river rock ,  was originally used to  store produce before the days of refrigeration.  The natural underground spring still flows and provides irrigation to the neighboring flowers and plantings.  Because of the naturally cool temperature, a wine cellar was the perfect fit.

2014 Pasadena Showcase House-Creekside Spring House by Mystic Water Gardens

Creekside Spring House by Mystic Water Gardens

What was covered here is only a fraction of what you will see on the 2014 Pasadena Showcase House tour.  The gardens are extensive (3.5 acres, remember?) The Botanical Retreat and Exotic Plant Observatory, which I don’t have a photo,  is not to be missed – especially if you are an orchid enthusiast, which I am. Tickets range from $25-$40, depending on time, and can be purchased by clicking on the link to the 2014 Pasadena Showcase House Ticket Info page.

The one thing that I found interesting is how the design and decor of the local Pasadena designers differ from those designers coming from West LA or other outlying areas.  Pasadena has such a rich history, and being able to pull from that history and bring a part of that into the home to tell a story is key- it’s not just about pretty things.  Definitely not flashy, not trendy, and quite a bit restrained – that is how I would describe Pasadena. But I do love how designers from outside the area bring in a fresh new approach to design.  It’s always fun to see what is trending in the market incorporated into the more traditional homes in the area.

The Pasadena Showcase House of the Arts is an all-volunteer organization that was formed in 1948 to provide funding for music programs in the Pasadena area, and the annual Pasadena Showcase House of Design benefit was formed 15 years later in 1965.  Having been a violinist and a member of the Pasadena Youth Symphony Orchestra and the Pasadena Young Musicians Orchestra back in the early-mid 80s, I have also personally benefitted from the revenue that the Pasadena Showcase House brings in.  In fact, the 2013 Pasadena Showcase House brought in $685,000 in gifts and grants which are used to provide scholarships, music education, music therapy, and the underwriting of concerts, and what they do makes a difference in the community.

When you come to the 2014 Pasadena Showcase House, be sure to wear flat shoes and make a day of it – there is a pub, Table 50, the on-site gourmet restaurant, and The Shops at Showcase, a collection of carefully selected vendors carrying a selection of gourmet foods, gift items, clothing, and housewares. Enjoy!  If you do happen to go, come back and let me know what you think in the comment section below!

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The Generation 6000 Miele Combi-Steam Oven in a New Truffle Brown Finish

Miele Truffle Brown

image via Miele

Last month, while in New York for the Architectural Digest Home Design Show, BlogTourNYC stopped by for a visit with Miele, to preview the Generation 6000 Miele Combi-Steam Oven.  Generation 6000, which is comprised of the ContourLine, which focuses on the use of stainless steel, and Pureline,which is more minimalist and architectural in style. The beauty of Miele’s Generation 6000 series is that both lines can be configured in a number of ways

Generation 6000 ContourLine

Miele Generation 6000 ContourLIne

ContourLine square configuration, image via Miele

Miele Generation 6000 ContourLIne

ContourLine “T” configuration, image via Miele

Miele ContourLine horizontal configuration

ContourLine horizontal configuration, image via Miele

Generation 6000 PureLine

Miele PureLine square configuration

PureLine square configuration, image via Miele

Miele PureLine vertical configuration

PureLine vertical configuration, image via Miele

The new Generation 6000 Series is comprised of the newest in technology, innovation, performance and is sensitive to how we live today.  With an intuitive interface, each and every Generation 6000 product also boasts ease of use.

The Architectural Digest Home Design Show marked the debut of the newest finish to the Generation 6000 series – Truffle Brown.   This beautiful, rich brown hue, evocative of the world’s most decadent chocolate, has subtle grey undertones, which enables it to blend in with a variety of woods and finishes, in addition to the use of polished concrete in today’s industrial inspired kitchens.   With its clean lines and specialty glass finish, the Generation 6000 Pureline Miele Combi-Steam Oven blends in seamlessly with today’s high end kitchen, and with the addition of Truffle Brown to the line, it is no doubt that Miele hits the mark with warming things up in the kitchen.

Miele Gen 6000 Combi-Steam Oven in Truffle Brown

Miele Gen 6000 Combi-Steam Oven in Truffle Brown

But beauty and visual aesthetics is only part of what makes Miele an innovator in high end kitchen appliances.  Miele, founded in 1899, started out with a promise of “Immer Besser”, German for “Forever Better” .  For more than a century, Miele has remained true to being “forever better” and to this day the company and brand is still at the forefront of kitchen design and technology.  Miele does not follow  trends, they take the lead and  continually strive (and succeed) at being true innovators in the industry. The visual appeal of the Miele Combi-Steam Oven coupled with the best and latest innovative features makes it the ideal appliance for the high-end residential kitchen.

More than ten years ago, Miele introduced steam cooking into the home, and has since built on top of their original technology to make the Miele Combi-Steam Oven forever better. Some of the features that sets it apart from the rest:

Steam and Convection

By offering combining steam and European convection technology into one appliance, one can regulate the cooking method, temperature, and moisture level. Miele was the first to introduce steam cooking more than 10 years ago.  Not only is steam considered a healthier way to cook, but it is great for roasting meats and baking bread because it injects moisture into whatever is being cooked, resulting in juicier meats and moist bread, while also providing a perfectly seared/browned exterior.

The Ability to Bake Artisanal Breads at Home

The Miele Combi-Steam oven is equipped with the features that allow the bread enthusiast to replicate the same processes used by professional bread bakers in the home. Below is just a sampling of the many types of artisanal breads the Miele Combi-Steam is capable of baking.  Hungry yet?

Miele Combi-Steam Oven bread menu

MasterChef Gourmet Technology

The Combi—Steam Oven is equipped with MasterChef Gourmet Technology which includes more than 100 automated programs, where one can either follow the on-screen prompts or use any one of the automated programs as a guide, tailoring it along the way to their own needs.  Just as the interface of the latest Smart Phone is easy to use and intuitive, so is that of the Miele Combi-Steam Oven.

Miele Combi-Steam Oven

Above is a photo of the 24″ Combi-Steam Oven shown below the Miele Built In Coffee System.  More on the Miele Coffee System on a later date ( I just received mine this past weekend and a review is forthcoming!)

The Lift-Up Control Panel

The water reservoir is cleverly hidden behind the control panel.  The touch of a button reveals the water reservoir, which allows the water supply to be replenished without having to open the oven door.  Because the water reservoir is placed behind the control panel instead of being placed within the oven cavity, the capacity of the oven is increased, allowing for the simultaneous cooking of larger dishes, therefore cutting down on overall cooking time.

Miele Combi Steam Oven

Image via Miele USA

My brother in law purchased a Miele steam oven just about ten years ago as he embarked on a complete remodel of his 4-level (maybe even 5 – I can’t keep track) San Francisco Noe Valley home.  Back then I wasn’t sure what to make of steam ovens, as they had just come on the market.  My brother in law is a man of VERY discerning taste, who meticulously researches the latest and best in technology for the home.  For Miele to have met his approval says a LOT…I’m not sure if I’ve even passed his test yet – ha! He is constantly on the go so he doesn’t cook a whole lot, nor does he ever eat leftovers.  His significant other tells me that the only leftovers  he eats is dim sum, reheated in his Miele steam oven, and each and every time it is cooked to perfection.  I’ve reheated dim sum and rice in the microwave several times and the results are not what I would call appetizing – dry corners and tough as rubber. Having perfectly cooked dim sum leftovers and fresh, moist rice  is reason enough to own a Miele Combi-Steam Oven.  The perfectly seared meat, artisanal breads, and all of the other features -that’s just icing on top of the cake!

Please note that Miele was one of several sponsors of BlogTourNYC, which covered my travel and expenses during my stay in New York.  No compensation was received for this post and all opinions expressed are my own.

Jeanne signature

 

High Point Spring 2014 Market Recap

Only 10 hours off a plane, after a 14 hour voyage back from North Carolina, and I’m back to give you my quick High Point Market Spring 2014 Recap.  You may know that this market I had the privilege of walking the market as one of 10 High Point Market Style Spotters, so I spent my 5 full days at market spotting the latest and best trends, absorbing in as much as I could as I traversed the halls of the many larger buildings and navigated the streets of downtown High Point to get to as many showrooms as I could.  Needless to say, I am beyond exhausted, but I know everyone is DYING to know what the season’s hottest trends are, so here I go with my initial key observations:

  • Brass is back- in a very big way
  • Big color combinations: coral and aqua, all shades of yellow and grey, opulent jewel tones and luxurious mink and sable browns
  • Rectilinear, less curvilinear shapes
  • Scale is moving away from the middle and either getting more oversized or smaller and scaled down, as many continue to downsize
  • The hexagon has evolved into more subtle and sophisticated pieces
  • Fashion is still a key influencer, with attention paid to hardware mimicking jewelry or that special high end designer handbag.
  • Trim on upholstery is important – cording, contrast piping, or CR Laine and Wesley Hall’s “fringed wooly”
  • Wood finishes are getting lighter – cerused wood finishes everywhere, the line is blurred between brown and grey
  • Seating is designed to be viewed from every angle, with a big emphasis on how things look from the back
  • Reinterpretations of iconic chairs of the past, but in new and innovative materials
  • Metallic glazed Linen on upholstery, accessories, and case goods

Brass

Brass and gold was the predominant trend at High Point Market for Spring 2014 and was seen in almost every showroom I visited.  Brass/gold  hardware, trim, fittings, table bases, case goods – it was every where!

High Point Market-Spring 2014

Bernhardt Interiors

Color

Coral and Aqua

Coral and aqua seemed to be a big color story – especially when combined with chinoiserie, which was seen at several showrooms, including CR Laine, Wesley Hall, Thibaut, and Lillian August, to name a few.  Could perhaps Benjamin Moore’s Color of the Year “Breath of Fresh Air” be an influencer here?  Color always looks more dynamic when it is paired with its complimentary (the color on the opposite end of the color wheel), which would make sense why coral (or tiger lily, as some have opted to name it) would be the perfect color to pair with this fresh shade of aqua.

High Point Market, Spring 2014

CR Laine

High Point Market Spring 2014 Recap

Piper Collection

High Point Market, Spring 2014

Lillian August

Yellow and Grey

Every shade of yellow and grey was represented and paired together in different ways.  This color palette was featured in every style from traditional to contemporary, with the intensity  of yellow increasing, the more contemporary the style.

High Point Market, Spring 2014

Chaddock

High Point Market, Spring 2014

Lillian August

Rich Browns and Jewel Tones

Rich opulent browns and jewel tones – think mink/sable, teal, magenta, violet – all the deep, rich colors that add drama when paired with brass. Very Las Vegas lounge meets Studio 54.

High Point Market Spring 2014 Recap - Bernhardt

Bernhardt

 

Times Two Design

Times Two Design

 

High Point Market Spring 2014 Recap-Century Furniture

Century Furniture

 

Red

Red was seen, but it was far more subtle than the other colors I saw at market.  Red was used  more as an accent, providing pops of color to otherwise neutral color schemes to bring a space to life, as in this barn red leather covered Neoclassical Café du Bac side table from Mary McDonald for Chaddock – one of my Style Spotter picks.

Mary McDonald for Chaddock

Mary McDonald for Chaddock

HIgh Point Market Spring 2014 Recap

Mary McDonald for Chaddock

 

 Scale

The scale of furniture is either getting bigger or smaller, which is indicative of our economic social structure these days.  The middle class is dwindling and the upper class and lower class income brackets  get larger as the economic classes are shifting around.  The better off are upsizing, and as a result, they are in need of larger scale furniture to fill their spaces.  On the other hand, the ones who are downsizing are in need of smaller scale furniture to fit their smaller spaces.  Their spaces may be getting smaller, but they are not willing to sacrifice on style and quality.

High Point Market, Spring 2014

Bernhardt Interiors

This large scale brass bed from Bernhardt was a show stopper.  The material and scale brings us back to the 80s – a time of rapid economic growth. Doesn’t this look so Trump back in his Ivana days – how many wives  ago is that? Like I said earlier- opulence is in!

High Point Market, Spring 2014

Mary McDonald for Chaddock

Mary Mc Donald plays with proportion to create the Madeleine Chair –  a Neoclassical Louis XVI styled slipper chair.  The back is kept tight and narrow, but the seat is made wider toward the front to create a visual play on perspective.  The width in the seat allows this chair to be used in place of a traditional accent chair and takes up far less real estate in the home, which makes it ideal for those occupying tighter living quarters.

Hexagon

High Point Market - Spring 2014

Serge de Troyer

The ubiquitous hexagon of the last two markets is still here, but in a much more subtle way, as is the case with this hexagon patterned bone coffee table pictured above.  In addition, Thibaut has an upholstered hexagon shaped ottoman(“For the Hex of It”)  in which multiples can be grouped together to form a larger ottoman grouping or coffee table.  Upholstered in a more traditional floral in Nemour from the Enchantment Collection, the stool is much more about the color and print than it is about the hexagon shape.

Thibaut-High Point Market Spring 2014 Recap

Thibaut

Fashion Influence – Furniture Hardware as Jewelry for the Home

It should be no surprise that fashion has been a key influencer in interior design both in color and furniture detail.  More and more I am seeing furniture hardware designed to appeal to women, as hardware is made to look more feminine by being fashioned after jewelry – shell/bone inlay, crystal encrusted knobs, gold chain links shaped into a knobs, lighting or even oversized and shaped into the base of an accent table.

High Point Market - Spring 2014

Caracole

High Point Market - Spring 2014

Caracole

Global Views

Global Views

Trim – Subtle but Significant Details

Attention is paid to details and trim such as cording, contrast piping, or as in the case below, a “fringed wooly” to add just a touch of detail.  Detail is everything, and the fringed wooly edge gives just a hint of texture to bring attention to the seams.

High Point Market, Spring 2014

CR Laine

High Point Spring 2014-5

CR Laine

High Point Market spring 2014 recap

Detailing on “The Madeleine Chair” -Mary Mc Donald for Chaddock

Mary McDonald uses just a hint of cording down the seams of her Madeleine Chair to bring attention to the seam and further accentuate the visual play on perspective.

Wood Finishes – Ambiguity is in

Wood finishes are getting lighter, but a bit ambiguous in color.  A little bit brown,  grey, bleached white?  Wood tones are shifting towards grey, but the line remains blurred between brown and grey.  Oftentimes the more pronounced grains such as oak, are given a cerused finish to bring out the beauty in the grain.  Slightly worn, sun bleached driftwood is what comes to mind.

High Point Market - Spring 2014

Bungalow 5

High Point Market, Spring 2014

Bungalow 5

 Seating Designed to be Viewed From Every Angle

As society is moving towards more loft living and open living spaces, the demand for seating that can be appreciated from every angle is on the rise.  In the past, furniture was merely set up against the wall and no attention was paid to the back – this was especially the case with sofas.  This is not the case anymore, as in many cases, furniture may be more beautiful seen from the back than from the front!

High Point Market - Spring 2014

Caracole

 

 

Iconic Chairs of the Past – Reinvented for Today

High Point Market-Spring 2014

Bernhardt Interiors

Taracea

Taracea’s interpretation of Le Corbusier’s LC-3 Chair

Above is a  modern interpretation of the decades old Egyptian Klismos chair by Bernhardt, but in a fresh and modern polished chrome.  In addition, I also saw chairs that were based on Marcel Breuer’s “Wassily” chair and Le Corbusier’s LC-3 Collection club chair.  There’s nothing like drawing from the past as inspiration for the future.

Metallic Glazed Linen

Metallic glazed linen was seen everywhere at market.  From upholstery, to pillows, and even case goods, there was a plethora of metallic glazed linen and in every metallic finish.  I especially love how Caracole combined silver and gold on the front panel of their ladies dresser (see below).  Because who says you can’t mix your metals? The metal is a glaze that is applied to the surface of the linen after it is woven, and because linen is textured, the glaze only adheres to the high spots on the linen, creating the most glorious, subtle sheen.

High Point Market-Spring 2014

Carcole Home

High Point Market-Spring 2014

CR Laine

The past couple of markets, I saw a lot of high gloss lacquer in every color imaginable.  While it is still offered in several showrooms, it is definitely a trend that has gone to the wayside, with other new trends emerging and beginning to take center stage. When I attended High Point Market last October and April, the trends seemed so evident, but this go around I definitely found that manufacturers are taking a more subtle approach -except with the brass trend, which was nearly impossible to miss.  In order to key in on what was trending, one had to really pay attention to the details.  Thought is put into the design of each object, and the small details are not overlooked.  As Charles Eames once said, “The details are not the details.  They make the design.”  And this seemed to be the case with what I saw at High Point Market this past week.

If you haven’t hopped over to the High Point Market Spring 2014 Pinterest boards, I urge you to do so, as it is a great way to get an overview of the best and latest at High Point Spring 2014 Market. Another great way to see what the High Point attendees have showcased as their favorite picks is to follow the hashtag (#HPMkt) on Instagram, and there you can find pictures in almost every showroom.  I hope you enjoyed my High Point Spring 2014 Market Recap.  Stay tuned – I still have much more to report on High Point Market in the upcoming weeks.

Also, I am up for the JDR Industry Best Blogger Awards and Cozy•Stylish•Chic is up for Best Blogger Award in Interior Design .  Tomorrow’s the last day to vote, so please take the time to vote if you truly enjoy my blog.  By the way – this is an easy one to vote for and doesn’t require leaving an email address, so I’d appreciate you taking the time to vote.

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